Monday, January 7, 2019

Shakespeare — wisdom and promise

Sonnet 91
by William Shakespeare
Some glory in their birth, some in their skill,
Some in their wealth, some in their body's force;
Some in their garments, though new-fangled ill;
Some in their hawks and hounds, some in their horse;
And every humour hath his adjunct pleasure,
Wherein it finds a joy above the rest:
But these particulars are not my measure;
All these I better in one general best.
Thy love is better than high birth to me,
Richer than wealth, prouder than garments' cost,
Of more delight than hawks or horses be;
And having thee, of all men's pride I boast:
Wretched in this alone, that thou mayst take
All this away, and me most wretched make.

Personal Postscript. — Shakespeare, often wise, was right: being loved by others is so much better than loving other things. On a different note, I wonder why I ever gave up on the promise I made to myself in 2018: read all of Shakespeare’s plays and poems. Well, on this frosty winter morning I think I might still have a few miles yet to go before I sleep, so I might just be able to keep that promise. Onward I go now with the Bard of Avon as my wise companion. 


5 comments:

  1. can't beat Shakspeare... i've found that snippets of his work find their way into a lot of conversations even when they're not recognized: truly one of the inventors of modern language...

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    1. Even as I hope to read Shakespeare, I know my mind will take me else .... I remain rudderless in heavy seas and strong winds .....

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    2. Correction ... elsewhere not else .....

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  2. I have Shakespeare's complete works on my shelf and I have so many to read. You encourage me to start up again. Maybe that will be my goal this year to get a couple more Shakespeare's under my belt.

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    1. My promises are too often made to be broken. Such is life.

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